Avoid Poor Managers in the Workplace with These Five Competencies

 

t_talegent_hr_consultants_assessmentIn his book, “First Break All the Rules,” Marcus Buckingham shared a good thought on leadership that many of us probably will agree on— “It is better to work for a great manager at an old-fashioned company than for a terrible manager in a company offering an enlightened, employee-focused culture.” As we have all read and know by now, people join companies but they leave managers.

Managers play such an important role that we can definitely improve the way we identify and develop them. The policy to ‘promote from within’ not only motivates staff, but also makes good business sense. Having managers that can establish effective systems, build strong teams and achieve business results add value to the business and ensure its competitive advantage. A study by Bliss and Associates estimates that the cost of a bad hire is around 150% of the employee’s annual compensation figure and significantly higher (200% to 250% of annual compensation) for managerial and sales positions.

There are five managerial competencies that have been proven to predict effectiveness in the role:

Lateral Thinking

Lateral Thinking is a measure of an individual’s tendency to think ahead and to generate novel strategies and ideas. This score should provide an indication of the individual’s foresight around anticipating problems and issues, whether they take a creative approach to solving problems, how likely they are to seek out opportunities for change and improvement, and how likely they are to generate innovative ideas.

Learning Focus

Learning Focus is a measure of an individual’s motivation to learn new knowledge and skills and to continually develop themselves. This score should provide an indication of whether they enjoy keeping up to date with developments in their field and researching new information. This score also takes into account the individual’s openness to feedback and whether they are likely to be defensive about improving themselves.

Social Intelligence

Social Intelligence is a measure of an individual’s tendency to dedicate time and effort into understanding other people’s thoughts and perspectives. This score should provide an indication of the individual’s ability to interpret and respond appropriately to social cues when interacting with people, as well as their interest in interacting and communicating with people.

Inner Drive

Inner Drive is a measure of an individual’s motivation to work hard and strive to achieve success. This score should provide an indication of the individual’s energy levels and desired pace of work, as well as whether they are likely to set challenging or more modest goals for themselves, and the passion they are likely to show in the pursuit of these goals. It also contains a measure of their ambition and motivation to advance.

Desire to Lead

Desire to Lead is a measure of an individual’s motivation to take responsibility for a team. This score should provide an indication of whether the individual is actually interested in being developed for leadership positions and whether they enjoy directing others. This score also reflects the individual’s confidence in their powers of persuasion and ability to motivate others.

>>>Read more about Talegent’s Leadership Growth Potential assessment/report.

By looking at these five competencies above and thinking through our own set of managers, we can identify competency gaps and develop their capabilities in a more targeted manner. The Academy of Management also places development, coaching and feedback as critical elements that can be used in conjunction with predictive assessment tools to avoid hiring poor managers. Combining these two methods can ease our challenges in finding our future generation of leaders and serve as input to better hiring, training and succession planning.